PortailForumCalendrierFAQRechercherS'enregistrerMembresGroupesConnexionAccueil
Partagez | 
 

 Gravity Probe B

Voir le sujet précédent Voir le sujet suivant Aller en bas 
AuteurMessage
lambda0


avatar

Masculin Nombre de messages : 4134
Age : 50
Localisation : Nord, France
Date d'inscription : 22/09/2005

MessageSujet: Gravity Probe B   Jeu 12 Avr 2007 - 17:53

Les premiers résultats de Gravity Probe B seront annoncés samedi prochain 14 avril.

http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/gpb/index.html
http://einstein.stanford.edu/
GP-B will have a strong presence at the American Physical Society (APS) meeting in Jacksonville, Florida, on 14-17 April 2007. During this meeting, we will emphasize three main themes:
* Successful completion of most challenging space-based experiment in NASA's history
* First scientific results from this historic mission
* Public release of Level2 science data (via NSSDC)
Four members of the GP-B team have been invited to speak at the APS meeting, beginning on Saturday morning, April 14th, with GP-B Principal Investigator, Francis Everitt, giving the plenary conference talk, entitled First Results from Gravity Probe B.

L'objectif de la mission était de vérifier de subtils effets gravitationnels prévus par la Relativité Générale, et en particulier l'effet d'entrainement de référentiel (Lense-Thirring).
http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gravity_Probe_B

Un petit écart par rapport à la théorie d'Einstein mettrait un peu d'animation chez les théoriciens et cosmologistes...

_________________
"The dinosaurs failed to survive due to the lack of a space program"
Arthur C. Clarke
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Space Opera
Modérateur
Modérateur

avatar

Masculin Nombre de messages : 12014
Age : 44
Localisation : France
Date d'inscription : 27/11/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Gravity Probe B   Jeu 12 Avr 2007 - 18:30

En discutant avec des gens de l'ESA, il semble que la mission LISA est aussi très attendue.
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur http://www.forum-conquete-spatiale.fr
zx


avatar

Masculin Nombre de messages : 2651
Age : 56
Localisation : Loir et Cher
Date d'inscription : 02/12/2005

MessageSujet: Einstein was right, probe shows   Lun 16 Avr 2007 - 20:47

Heeeeu, il est certain que j'aurai un peu de mal de discuter des theories
de Mr Einstein. C'est hors de mes compétences.

Source :

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/science/nature/6561391.stm

Article :

Einstein was right, probe shows

Early results from a Nasa mission designed to test two key predictions of Albert Einstein show the great man was right about at least one of them.

It will take another eight months to determine whether he got the other correct say scientists analysing data from Nasa's Gravity Probe B satellite.

The spacecraft was launched into orbit from California, US, on 20 April 2004.

The mission's chief scientist presented details at a physics meeting in Jacksonville, Florida.

Gravity Probe B uses four ultra-precise gyroscopes to measure two effects of Einstein's general relativity theory.


One of these effects is called the geodetic effect, the other is called frame dragging. A common analogy is that of placing a heavy bowling ball on to a rubber sheet.

The bowling ball will sit in a dip, distorting the rubber sheet around itself in much the way a massive object such as the Earth distorts space and time around itself.

Minute measurements

In the analogy, the geodetic effect is similar to the shape of the dip created when the ball is placed on to the rubber sheet.



If the bowling ball is then rotated, it will start to drag the rubber sheet around with it. In a similar way, the Earth drags local space and time around with it - ever so slightly - as it rotates.

Over the course of a year, these effects would cause the angle of spin of the gyroscopes to shift by minute amounts.

The mission's principal investigator, Professor Francis Everitt, from Stanford University, discussed preliminary results at the American Physical Society meeting in Jacksonville at the weekend.

The data from Gravity Probe B's gyroscopes clearly confirm Einstein's geodetic effect to a precision of better than 1%.

The scientists from Stanford are still trying to extract its signature of frame-dragging from the data.

They plan to announce the final results of the experiment in December 2007, following eight more months of data analysis.

Larger puzzle

Professor Tim Sumner, a physicist at Imperial College London, told BBC News: "Having an announcement at this stage, on the way to the final result, is very encouraging. I'm very pleased to see that the result has now been released.


"Most individual measurements are part of a larger puzzle. But general relativity is one of the big branches of physics and it is poorly tested at the moment because of the relative weakness of gravity as a force."

"I would see this as a piece of solid verification to underpin general relativity, which occupies a special place in physics."

William Bencze, Gravity Probe B programme manager at Stanford University in California, said: "Understanding the details of this science data is a bit like an archaeological dig.

"A scientist starts with a bulldozer, follows with a shovel, and then finally uses dental picks and toothbrushes to clear the dust away from the treasure. We are passing out the toothbrushes now."

Unified theory

Tim Sumner said few physicists were expecting to see a deviation from Albert Einstein's predictions in this experiment.

But he said that other tests could start to reveal cracks in general relativity, suggesting where modifications might be made.


Physicists have been unable to incorporate gravity into a unified theory to describe all that is known about the fundamental forces between elementary particles in nature.

Modifications to general relativity could be important steps towards a unified theory.

"There is an expectation that at some level we will expose a departure from pure general relativity as envisaged by Einstein,"Professor Sumner said.

"One of the areas of general relativity that is less well founded is when you get into very intense gravitational field interactions. Some astrophysical objects will be in very high field situations such as pairs of massive black holes orbiting one another."

A joint mission between Nasa and the European Space Agency called Lisa (Laser Interferometer Space Antenna) will study gravitational waves coming from binary systems such as these.

General relativity is not expected to break down in these situations. But Lisa should help scientists understand how the theory works in "high field" gravitational regimes such as pairs of massive black holes.

Other experiments are due to test the equivalence principle, one of the foundation stones of general relativity. This principle stems from the observation that when two objects are dropped, they will accelerate at the same rate.

"Here there is a theoretical framework where one might expect to see a departure from the equivalence principle," said Professor Sumner. "This might give us pointers as to the way forward."

The Imperial College physicist is involved in two mission concepts to test the equivalence principle. One is the Satellite Test of the Equivalence Principle (Step), which has been proposed by some of the same scientists involved in the Gravity Probe B mission. Another is the GrAnd Unification and Gravity Explorer (Gauge).

Gravity Probe B was launched from Vandenburg Air Force Base in California on 20 April 2004. It transmitted its data for exactly 50 weeks, from August 2004 to August 2005.
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Blink / Pamplemousse


avatar

Masculin Nombre de messages : 1159
Age : 33
Localisation : Nevers (58)
Date d'inscription : 30/09/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Gravity Probe B   Lun 16 Avr 2007 - 22:27

zx a écrit:
Heeeeu, il est certain que j'aurai un peu de mal de discuter des theories
de Mr Einstein. C'est hors de mes compétences.
Mais non ! C'est hyperfacile. Moi même, qui suis pourtant une grosse buse en maths, je comprends. La masse de la Terre déforme l'espace-temps autour d'elle, et sa rotation le vrille légèrement. C'est bête à manger du foin...
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
lambda0


avatar

Masculin Nombre de messages : 4134
Age : 50
Localisation : Nord, France
Date d'inscription : 22/09/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Gravity Probe B   Mar 17 Avr 2007 - 10:30

Sujet déjà ouvert ici :
http://www.forum-conquete-spatiale.fr/Actualite-spatiale-c3/Exploration-du-systeme-solaire-f3/Divers-f40/Gravity-Probe-B-t3098.htm

En fait, il semble que jusqu'à présent, l'analyse des données n'a pas permis d'extraire la signature de l'effet d'entrainement de référentiel (frame dragging=Lense Thirring) à cause d'une erreur systématique (un couple parasite).

A+

_________________
"The dinosaurs failed to survive due to the lack of a space program"
Arthur C. Clarke
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
lambda0


avatar

Masculin Nombre de messages : 4134
Age : 50
Localisation : Nord, France
Date d'inscription : 22/09/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Gravity Probe B   Mar 17 Avr 2007 - 12:57

Ce qu'en disent les gens de Stanford :
http://news-service.stanford.edu/pr/2007/pr-aps-041807.html

"...
GP-B scientists expect to announce the final results of the experiment in December 2007, following eight months of further data analysis and refinement. Today, Everitt and his team are poised to share what they have found so far—namely that the data from the GP-B gyroscopes clearly confirm Einstein's predicted geodetic effect to a precision of better than 1 percent. However, the frame-dragging effect is 170 times smaller than the geodetic effect, and Stanford scientists are still extracting its signature from the spacecraft data. The GP-B instrument has ample resolution to measure the frame-dragging effect precisely, but the team has discovered small torque and sensor effects that must be accurately modeled and removed from the result.
...
The electrostatic patches also cause small torques on the gyroscopes, particularly when the space vehicle axis of symmetry is not aligned with the gyroscope spin axes. Torques cause the spin axes of the gyroscopes to change orientation, and in certain circumstances, this effect can look like the relativity signal GP-B measures. Fortunately, the drifts due to these torques have a precise geometrical relationship to the misalignment of the gyro spin/vehicle symmetry axis and can be removed from the data without directly affecting the relativity measurement.
..."

Les mesures étaient suffisamment précises pour identifier la précession géodétique, mais pas l'effet Lense-Thirring, à cause de charges électrostatiques induisant un couple parasite sur les gyroscopes.
Mais apparemment, le problème pourrait se rattraper par traitement de données d'ici la fin de l'année.

A+

_________________
"The dinosaurs failed to survive due to the lack of a space program"
Arthur C. Clarke
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
zx


avatar

Masculin Nombre de messages : 2651
Age : 56
Localisation : Loir et Cher
Date d'inscription : 02/12/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Gravity Probe B   Mer 18 Avr 2007 - 0:09

c'est beaucoup mieux en francais

Source :

http://www.techno-science.net/?onglet=news&news=3970

Article :

La sonde Gravity-Probe-B mesure les bosses de l'espace-temps

L'analyse des premiers résultats du satellite Gravity-Probe-B (GP-B) confirme une prévision de la théorie générale de la relativité d'Einstein avec une précision meilleure que 1%. "Pour la première fois, nous pouvons directement observer un des effets prédits par Einstein," affirme Francis Everitt de l'université de Stanford en Californie et responsable de la mission.



Gyroscopes de la sonde GP-B

Lancé en avril 2004 (voir notre news), le satellite a utilisé quatre gyroscopes de haute précision pour mesurer deux effets prévus par la théorie de la relativité générale.

Le premier, appelé l'effet géodésique, prévoit que la masse de la terre provoque une bosse dans l'espace-temps qui devait provoquer une inclinaison de chaque gyroscope de 0,0018°, soit 6606 millisecondes d'arc, par an. Le second, un effet plus subtil appelé frame dragging (ou effet Lense-Thirring en français), prévoit la façon dont la Terre dans sa rotation, entraîne l'espace-temps avec elle.

Auparavant, les astronomes avaient mesuré ces deux effets en envoyant des rayons laser sur des miroirs installés sur la Lune par les astronautes des missions Apollo. "L'orbite de la Lune agit comme un gyroscope," note Clifford Will, expert en relativité générale à l'université de St Louis. "Mais les mesures lunaires sont des mesures indirectes. La sonde GP-B nous donne une mesure directe qui est unique et nouvelle."

Les chercheurs de la mission Probe-B ont enregistré des mesures de l'effet géodésique qui correspondent aux valeurs prévues par Einstein mais les mesures du frame dragging n'ont pas encore atteint la précision obtenue lors des expériences lunaires. "Ce ne sont pas les résultats que nous avions espéré à ce stade," admet Bill Bencze, un des managers de la mission. Ceci est dû en partie à une série d'éruptions chromosphériques du Soleil en mars 2005 qui ont interrompu les observations et qui limiteront l'exactitude finale de l'expérience. Jusqu'ici, l'équipe a "entrevu quelques traces" de frame dragging mais n'est pas encore en mesure de chiffrer cet effet

Cependant, le plus grand défi pour l'équipe est actuellement de rectifier certains comportements inattendus des gyroscopes qui modifient leurs orientations et peuvent ainsi simuler des effets relativistes. Bencze pense avec confiance qu'en décembre prochain l'équipe comprendra suffisamment ces effets pour améliorer la précision des mesures d'un facteur 20, pour obtenir finalement une exactitude meilleure que 0,01%.

Les prévisions de la relativité générale correspondent bien à la précision dont est capable la sonde, mais cela pourrait tout aussi bien changer lorsque l'équipe annoncera des résultats plus précis. "Nous ne cherchons pas à assurer la véracité de la relativité générale à tout prix," déclare Bencze, qui précise que le travail de l'équipe est d'effectuer les meilleures mesures possibles, non de confirmer la théorie.
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Space Opera
Modérateur
Modérateur

avatar

Masculin Nombre de messages : 12014
Age : 44
Localisation : France
Date d'inscription : 27/11/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Gravity Probe B   Mer 18 Avr 2007 - 9:43

zx a écrit:
appelé frame dragging (ou effet Lense-Thirring en français)
J'adore !
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur http://www.forum-conquete-spatiale.fr
Invité
Invité




MessageSujet: Re: Gravity Probe B   Mer 18 Avr 2007 - 18:41

Sujets fusionnés !
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
 
Gravity Probe B
Voir le sujet précédent Voir le sujet suivant Revenir en haut 
Page 1 sur 1

Permission de ce forum:Vous ne pouvez pas répondre aux sujets dans ce forum
Le forum de la conquête spatiale :: Actualité spatiale :: Exploration du système solaire, et au delà ... :: Exoplanètes, cosmologie, et divers-
Créer un forum | © phpBB | Forum gratuit d'entraide | Contact | Signaler un abus | Forum gratuit