PortailForumCalendrierFAQRechercherS'enregistrerMembresGroupesConnexionAccueilTwitter-FCS
Partagez | 
 

 Comment se débarasser d'un mort dans une mission vers Mars ?

Voir le sujet précédent Voir le sujet suivant Aller en bas 
AuteurMessage
Space Opera
Modérateur
Modérateur



Masculin Nombre de messages : 10770
Age : 43
Localisation : France
Date d'inscription : 27/11/2005

MessageSujet: Comment se débarasser d'un mort dans une mission vers Mars ?   Ven 4 Mai 2007 - 10:05

CAPE CANAVERAL, Florida (AP) -- How do you get rid of the body of a dead astronaut on a three-year mission to Mars and back?

When should the plug be pulled on a critically ill astronaut who is using up precious oxygen and endangering the rest of the crew? Should NASA employ DNA testing to weed out astronauts who might get a disease on a long flight?

With NASA planning to land on Mars 30 years from now, and with the recent discovery of the most "Earth-like" planet ever seen outside the solar system, the space agency has begun to ponder some of the thorny practical and ethical questions posed by deep space exploration.

Some of these who-gets-thrown-from-the-lifeboat questions are outlined in a NASA document on crew health obtained by The Associated Press through a Freedom of Information Act request.

NASA doctors and scientists, with help from outside bioethicists and medical experts, hope to answer many of these questions over the next several years.

"As you can imagine, it's a thing that people aren't really comfortable talking about," said Dr. Richard Williams, NASA's chief health and medical officer. "We're trying to develop the ethical framework to equip commanders and mission managers to make some of those difficult decisions should they arrive in the future."

One topic that is evidently too hot to handle: How do you cope with sexual desire among healthy young men and women during a mission years long?

Sex is not mentioned in the document and has long been almost a taboo topic at NASA. Williams said the question of sex in space is not a matter of crew health but a behavioral issue that will have to be taken up by others at NASA.

The agency will have to address the matter sooner or later, said Paul Root Wolpe, a bioethicist at the University of Pennsylvania who has advised NASA since 2001.

"There is a decision that is going to have to be made about mixed-sex crews, and there is going to be a lot of debate about it," he said.

The document does spell out some health policies in detail, such as how much radiation astronauts can be exposed to from space travel (No more radiation than the amount that would increase the risk of cancer by 3 percent over the astronaut's career) and the number of hours crew members should work each week (No more than 48 hours).

But on other topics -- such as steps for disposing of the dead and cutting off an astronaut's medical care if he or she cannot survive -- the document merely says these are issues for which NASA needs a policy.

"There may come a time in which a significant risk of death has to be weighed against mission success," Wolpe said. "The idea that we will always choose a person's well-being over mission success, it sounds good, but it doesn't really turn out to be necessarily the way decisions always will be made."

For now, astronauts and cosmonauts who become critically sick or injured at the international space station -- something that has never happened -- can leave the orbiting outpost 220 miles above Earth and return home within hours aboard a Russian Soyuz space vehicle.

That wouldn't be possible if a life-and-death situation were to arise on a voyage to Mars, where the nearest hospital is millions of miles away.

Moreover, Mars-bound astronauts will not always be able to rely on instructions from Mission Control, since it would take nearly a half-hour for a question to be asked and an answer to come back via radio.

Astronauts going to the moon and Mars for long periods of time must contend with the basic health risks from space travel, multiplied many times over: radiation, the loss of muscle and bone, and the psychological challenges of isolation.

NASA will consider whether astronauts must undergo preventive surgery, such as an appendectomy, to head off medical emergencies during a mission, and whether astronauts should be required to sign living wills with end-of-life instructions.

The space agency also must decide whether to set age restrictions on the crew, and whether astronauts of reproductive age should be required to bank sperm or eggs because of the risk of genetic mutations from radiation exposure during long trips.

Already, NASA is considering genetic screening in choosing crews on the long-duration missions. That is now prohibited.

"Genetic screening must be approached with caution ... because of limiting employment and career opportunities based on use of genetic information," Williams said.

NASA's three major tragedies resulting in 17 deaths -- Apollo 1, Challenger and Columbia -- were caused by technical rather than medical problems. NASA never has had to abort a mission because of health problems, though the Soviet Union had three such episodes.

Some believe the U.S. space agency has not adequately prepared for the possibility of death during a mission.

"I don't think they've been great at dealing with this type of thing in the past," said former astronaut Story Musgrave, a six-time space shuttle flier who has a medical degree. "But it's very nice that they're considering it now."
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur http://www.forum-conquete-spatiale.fr
lambda0
Modérateur
Modérateur



Masculin Nombre de messages : 4124
Age : 49
Localisation : Nord, France
Date d'inscription : 22/09/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Comment se débarasser d'un mort dans une mission vers Mars ?   Ven 4 Mai 2007 - 10:32

Astrogreg a écrit:
CAPE CANAVERAL, Florida (AP) -- How do you get rid of the body of a dead astronaut on a three-year mission to Mars and back?
...

Quel est le problème ?
Quand il y a un décès sur un navire, on envoie le cercueil à la mer. L'espace n'est pas une sépulture moins décente, il y en a même qui sont prêts à payer pour envoyer leurs cendres là haut.

Pour le reste, il faut raison garder, les explorateurs ont été confrontés depuis des siècles à certains des problèmes évoqués. Les explorateurs de l'Antarctique de l'expédition de Shackleton n'avaient pas non plus un hôpital dans les parages.

A+

_________________
"The dinosaurs failed to survive due to the lack of a space program"
Arthur C. Clarke
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Space Opera
Modérateur
Modérateur



Masculin Nombre de messages : 10770
Age : 43
Localisation : France
Date d'inscription : 27/11/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Comment se débarasser d'un mort dans une mission vers Mars ?   Ven 4 Mai 2007 - 10:59

Astrogreg a écrit:
"As you can imagine, it's a thing that people aren't really comfortable talking about," said Dr. Richard Williams, NASA's chief health and medical officer. "We're trying to develop the ethical framework to equip commanders and mission managers to make some of those difficult decisions should they arrive in the future."
Il me semble que d'être mal à l'aise de parler de ça, c'est comme dire qu'on est mal à l'aise de parler de risques sur un lanceur au décollage. Je trouve ça malsain de ne pas en parler ouvertement au contraire, même si c'est un sujet que personne n'aime aborder. Il y a une nuance entre ne pas aimer aborder le sujet, et être mal à l'aise dessus...
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur http://www.forum-conquete-spatiale.fr
lambda0
Modérateur
Modérateur



Masculin Nombre de messages : 4124
Age : 49
Localisation : Nord, France
Date d'inscription : 22/09/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Comment se débarasser d'un mort dans une mission vers Mars ?   Ven 4 Mai 2007 - 12:01

Etant donné l'épaisseur des études diverses et variées depuis des décennies sur les effets de l'impesanteur, les effets possibles des radiations, la psychologie, etc., je suis un peu surpris que les gens de la NASA puissent être mal à l'aise à l'évocation de problèmes médicaux et de leurs conséquences. Je pensais au contraire que tout celà était intégré depuis longtemps.
Par ailleurs, je ne comprends pas en quoi tout celà nécessiterait une "éthique" fondamentalement différente de celle appliquée dans de nombreuses situations dangereuses sur Terre, comme dans le domaine militaire par exemple ? L'impossibilité de secourir un blessé, ou les choix difficiles pouvant entrainer des décès ne sont pas des problèmes nouveaux pour les militaires.

A+

_________________
"The dinosaurs failed to survive due to the lack of a space program"
Arthur C. Clarke
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
montmein69




Masculin Nombre de messages : 13630
Age : 65
Localisation : région lyonnaise
Date d'inscription : 01/10/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Comment se débarasser d'un mort dans une mission vers Mars ?   Ven 4 Mai 2007 - 19:08

lambda0 a écrit:

Par ailleurs, je ne comprends pas en quoi tout celà nécessiterait une "éthique" fondamentalement différente de celle appliquée dans de nombreuses situations dangereuses sur Terre, comme dans le domaine militaire par exemple ? L'impossibilité de secourir un blessé, ou les choix difficiles pouvant entrainer des décès ne sont pas des problèmes nouveaux pour les militaires.

Je trouve plutôt sain que l'on se pose les problèmes. L'éthique des militaires n'étant pas toujours une référence.
Même en dehors des périodes de conflit, il y a eu des décisions pour le moins contestables. Pour l'armée française, "la grande muette" a souvent mérité son nom.
Je pense notamment aux essais nucléaires d'abord dans le Sahara, puis dans le Pacifique, ou du personnel militaire et civil et probablement des populations se sont retrouvés exposés ... et où les recours en justice sont interminables.
L'armée américaine devant avoir dans ses placards au moins autant de situations problématiques.

Pour en revenir au problème posé des voyages très longs et où il faudra se débrouiller avec les moyens du bord, je crains qu'il soit impossible de prévoir toutes les situations qui pourraient se présenter. Et finalement ce sera l'équipage concerné qui prendra les décisions.
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Apolloman
Modérateur
Modérateur



Masculin Nombre de messages : 11393
Age : 40
Localisation : Lédignan (30 Gard) France
Date d'inscription : 20/04/2006

MessageSujet: Re: Comment se débarasser d'un mort dans une mission vers Mars ?   Ven 4 Mai 2007 - 19:18

lambda0 a écrit:
Astrogreg a écrit:
CAPE CANAVERAL, Florida (AP) -- How do you get rid of the body of a dead astronaut on a three-year mission to Mars and back?
...

Quel est le problème ?
Quand il y a un décès sur un navire, on envoie le cercueil à la mer. L'espace n'est pas une sépulture moins décente, il y en a même qui sont prêts à payer pour envoyer leurs cendres là haut.

Pour le reste, il faut raison garder, les explorateurs ont été confrontés depuis des siècles à certains des problèmes évoqués. Les explorateurs de l'Antarctique de l'expédition de Shackleton n'avaient pas non plus un hôpital dans les parages.

A+

Effectivement je serais plutôt de l'avis de lambda0 quel beau écrin que d'avoir l'univers comme derniere demeure Super

_________________
Paul Cultrera/Apolloman
Webmaster du site http://www.de-la-terre-a-la-lune.com/
consacré au programme Apollo.
Modérateur du forum de la conquète spatiale http://www.forum-conquete-spatiale.fr/portal.htm
Journaliste collaborateur d'Espace et Exploration le magazine de l'aventure spatiale
http://www.espace-exploration.com/

Le savoir est un trésor à partager avec tout le monde...
Knowledge is a treasure to share with everyone .
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur http://www.de-la-terre-a-la-lune.com/
Mustard
Admin
Admin



Masculin Nombre de messages : 22839
Age : 47
Localisation : Rouen/Normandie
Date d'inscription : 16/09/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Comment se débarasser d'un mort dans une mission vers Mars ?   Ven 4 Mai 2007 - 19:36

Même chose, en mer les arins morts sont envoyés à l'Océan et les marins le prennent comme un honneur et une digne sépulture. Jepense que ce serait forcément pareil pour l'espace.
En toute franchise, je pense que beaucoup d'astronautes ou même astronomes aimeraient reposer en paix dans l'espace.
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur http://www.forum-conquete-spatiale.fr
montmein69




Masculin Nombre de messages : 13630
Age : 65
Localisation : région lyonnaise
Date d'inscription : 01/10/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Comment se débarasser d'un mort dans une mission vers Mars ?   Ven 4 Mai 2007 - 19:50

Je ne pense pas que ce soit la sépulture d'un mort qui soit le problème principal soulevé dans l'article.
Exposer quelqu'un une longue période aux rayonnements si une phase critique de l'expedition le nécessite, débrancher un malade car il consomme de l'oxygène qui sera peut-être indispensable à la survie du reste de l'équipage ... sont de vrais problèmes auxquels un équipage de 5 ou 6 hommes, seuls, pourrait avoir à faire face.

Et sans parler de situations critiques, il faut accepter en connaissance de cause, les "risques" de telles longues missions dans l'espace hostile (sont cités la perte de fertilité, la perte irréversible de masse osseuse etc ...)
Ce qui est faire face en conscience aux risques réels, au delà des couplets sur "ils y vont pour la gloire de l'espèce humaine" ou "c'est inscrit dans nos gènes de poser notre pied partout dans le cosmos"

Je note avec amusement que la question du "sexe" dans l'espace .. reste un sujet apparenté à la "patate chaude" auquel personne ne veut se hasarder à apporter une réponse ; "ce n'est pas un problème de santé ... mais de comportement" sage
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Henri
Modérateur
Modérateur



Masculin Nombre de messages : 4213
Age : 60
Localisation : Strasbourg, France
Date d'inscription : 22/09/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Comment se débarasser d'un mort dans une mission vers Mars ?   Ven 4 Mai 2007 - 21:43

La tradition du rejet des dépouilles à la mer tire son origine de l'impossibilité autrefois de conserver les cadavres à bord durant de longues semaines.
Même si installer une morgue dans un bâtiment naviguant en haute mer ne pose plus de problèmes aujourd'hui, la tradition de l'océan comme sépulture est restée.

_________________
Les fous ouvrent les voies qu'empruntent ensuite les sages. (Carlo Dossi)
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur http://goo.gl/GrrJMb
maxime




Masculin Nombre de messages : 381
Age : 26
Localisation : Salon de Provence
Date d'inscription : 10/03/2007

MessageSujet: Re: Comment se débarasser d'un mort dans une mission vers Mars ?   Ven 4 Mai 2007 - 22:17

A ce propos je viens de lire dans un numéro d'Espace magazine celui spécial apollo 11 (je viens de le recevoir) que d'après Armstrong il n'y avait aucune procédure prévue en cas de problème avec le moteur de remonté du LM. Il parle de faire baisser la pression pour plonger l'équipage dans un état comateux. Et de permettre des comunications privées avec la famille. En savez vous plus, des procédures ont elles été imaginées pour des futures missions sur Mars? Que se passerait-il si un équipage était bloqué sur Mars ou sur la Lune dans un avenir proche serait-il possible d'imaginer une mission de secours?
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
 
Comment se débarasser d'un mort dans une mission vers Mars ?
Voir le sujet précédent Voir le sujet suivant Revenir en haut 
Page 1 sur 1

Permission de ce forum:Vous ne pouvez pas répondre aux sujets dans ce forum
Le forum de la conquête spatiale :: Actualité spatiale :: Exploration du système solaire, et au delà ... :: Mars et ses lunes-
Créer un forum | © phpBB | Forum gratuit d'entraide | Contact | Signaler un abus | Forum gratuit